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MERCY Disaster

Begin prepared for disasters is one of the most needed practices that human beings require for survival. MERCYWORLDWIDE believes that there is only one race, the human race, and as such every individual every individual should be prepared as the worst disaster is not being prepared.

In our efforts to assist the humanitarian need for disaster preparedness around the world MERCY has implemented the establishment of the “MERCY village” in all 6 continents of the world and in the 54 cities that have an established MERCY branch. Each MERCY village will take 6 six years to be completed, in third world countries, and during the fourth year of establishment there will be a focus on disaster preparedness.

The establishment of the MERCY village follows the pattern below:

  1. Water – First Year –> MERCY H2O
  2. Food – Second Year –> MERCY Meals
  3. Health – Third Year –> MERCY Health
  4. Disaster Preparedness – Fourth Year –> MERCY Disaster
  5. Education – Fifth Year –> MERCY Education
  6. Workforce Development – Six Year –> MERCY Workforce
Disasters are more prevalent today

In fact, some of the worst disasters have occurred in the past decade: the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami (2004), Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar (2008), and the Haiti earthquake (2010), to name a few.

Disasters have increased in size and extent of devastation

In fact, some of the worst disasters have occurred in the past decade: the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami (2004), Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar (2008), and the Haiti earthquake (2010), to name a few.

Disasters have become more complex

We now have different types, classifications, and phases of disasters. For example, large primary disasters like earthquakes often give rise to secondary disasters like prolonged power outages. Or, disasters can be classified according to the extent of the destruction they cause, or whether they are due to natural or man-made causes (Aten & Boan, 2013).

Pandemics can spread rapidly and overwhelm the under prepared

An influenza pandemic, or other infectious disease, can spread from person-to-person causing serious illness across the country, or around the globe, in a very short time (Ibid.).

Disasters impact the whole person and the whole community

Each requires an immediate, intermediate, and long-term response. With their long-term presence, local knowledge, and ethos of compassion and care for others, churches are uniquely positioned to serve their communities in the midst of a disaster and the response (Ibid.).

Disasters reveal who are the most vulnerable in a community

Identifying the most vulnerable in advance can reduce the impact upon them. Examples of at-risk members include the elderly, people with serious or chronic medical conditions, handicapped people, and children (Ibid.).